You put the “um” in “numbers”

“What do the numbers say?”

Numbers are often seen as this objective piece of data. And because they are objective, they cannot lie, right? We might not always like what they tell us, and they don’t always tell the complete story, but they’re often hard to argue with. How’s my blog doing? Well let me check the analytics and number of viewers. How’s my health doing? Well let me check my blood work: my blood pressure, my cholesterol numbers, my A1c. Success criteria is often operationalized in numbers. Who won the race? Let’s check the times. Who won the game? Let’s check the score.

You learn to trust the numbers. And while you can interpret the numbers differently, put them into context, explain the variance or trends with outside information and external variables, the numbers are what they are.

You start to crave the numbers. If some numbers are good, more must be better. I recently switched to a smart scale. I wasn’t just content with knowing my weight, I wanted to know my body fat percentage and my muscle mass percentage too. More numbers could help elucidate what’s really going on in my body and alleviate any uncertainty. If I’m working out more, but I’m gaining weight, I would feel much better knowing the weight was coming from more muscle mass and not body fat.

You rely on the numbers. They show your progress. They show your weaknesses and your strengths. The numbers are your guideposts.

So imagine how you’d feel if those numbers fail you. When all of the sudden, they can’t be trusted. And instead of helping you, they lead you astray.

Lost? Frustrated? Angry? Disappointed?

That’s how I felt as I returned home from my 3 month endo appointment this week. In the past 3 months I’ve had one major change, I switched insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors. I was having so many issues with the sensor leading up to the appointment. It would suddenly stop working after only 1 to 2 days, it was inaccurate compared to my finger tests, the trending arrows were completely misleading. I told my doctor these problems, but I was still optimistic. After all, I had started eating healthier, been more consistent with my metformin to help with blood sugar spikes, I didn’t feel like my A1c should have been much different from 3 months earlier. But I was wrong. Those inaccurate numbers had contributed to my A1c going up .6 of a point. This may not seem like much, but when you are trying to get below a certain number and are at the lower end, to suddenly be back at the higher end is very discouraging.

numbersAll day I alternated between being livid and just feeling sad. I felt let down by the numbers I rely on every minute of the day to be healthy. By the end of the day, I made the decision to switch back to my old, reliable sensor. Enough is enough. My health shouldn’t be made worse by the devices that are meant to improve it.

Numbers are complicated. So is having diabetes. And that means being critical of the numbers, always. Because what is meant to be helping you could actually be making things worse if you aren’t careful.

 

 

 

Disconnected

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I stared at my CGM, the screen reflecting my own feelings lately. ??? The 3 question marks indicating that the receiver can’t establish a reading from the sensor, that it’s confused, lost…disconnected.

The week leading up to an endo appointment has become a time of reflection. I’m forced to look back on the past 3 months and evaluate how I feel I’ve done with managing my diabetes. At my appointment, my A1c number will give objective evidence to these months, but for now, it’s my own subjective assessment.

I don’t need to see my A1c number to know that the past 3 months have not been great. I see my glucose numbers each day, each hour, each minute. I can’t escape the numbers. But the feeling that I have is hard to describe. Unmotivated? Stuck? Apathetic? No it’s not quite that. It’s more…disconnected.

How do I become disconnected from a chronic disease that I literally think about constantly? From the medical devices that are physically connected to be 24/7? I’m not quite sure. Perhaps it’s just day after day, going through the motions, hoping for different outcomes, disappointed when it’s more of the same.

Maybe I’m burnt out. Maybe I have lost some motivation. Maybe I’m just tired. But after years of going to each appointment with the same goal and continuously falling short, something has to change.

But change takes work and it’s hard. Maybe it’s changing what I eat to avoid blood sugar spikes. But I love food, I don’t want to change. Maybe it’s being better about carb counting and bolusing on time, but I’ve tried, how is this time going to be different? Maybe it’s asking about the use of drugs for type 2 that have been shown to help type 1s, but I’m nervous about the side effects and using drugs that haven’t been well studied for type 1s. But most of all, maybe I’m afraid of failing. Because what if I try, like really try, and I still find myself in this same spot 3 months from now? What does that mean for my future? What does it mean when I’m ready to start a family and need to get my A1c much lower than where it is now? What if I can’t do it?

I know that I can’t let fear hold me back, I know that I can’t be afraid to try. And that “failing” isn’t really failing at all, it is just a lesson on what will work for me and what won’t, all ultimately getting me closer to my goal.

Hopefully my endo can help me rebuild these connections and face my fears. All I know is that I won’t succeed unless I’m willing to try.

Diabetes Blog Week Day 4- Healthcare Experience

Diabetes Blog Week

Today’s topic: Most people who live with a chronic illness end up with a lot of experience when it comes to dealing with healthcare. How would you improve or change your healthcare experience? What would you like to see happening during medical visits with your healthcare team? How about when dealing with your health insurance companies? What’s your Healthcare Wish List or Biggest Frustration? 

Oh man, I don’t even know where to begin. I’ve had so many awful experiences with doctors, offices, insurance companies and pharmacies. I can’t forget about the Epic Letter of Complaint that I wrote and sent to a former endocrinology office. Or the more recent Insurance Frustrations I’ve dealt with that are all too common.

Unfortunately I have yet to have a doctor and office where I felt like I consistently received competent, respectful, helpful care. Some visits and doctors have been better than others, but on the whole, there is much room for improvement. In fact, at my last appointment, the doctor forgot to check my A1c! We’re talking lack of basic diabetes care here.

So I’d like to invite you to my imaginary endocrinology appointment, an idealistic appointment where I get the exact care and consideration that that I as a patient and person deserve (and you know, a few extra perks since this is my fantasy appointment after all).

Receptionist: Good morning Reva, you’re here to see Dr. Rainbow?  Please have a seat in the massage waiting chairs, the doctor will be with you in a just couple minutes. She is actually running ahead of schedule this morning.

Nurse: Hello Reva, come on back with me. I can take your pump, dexcom, and meters from you. We’re going to download all your numbers and information and use a software that graphs them together. Do you use any additional apps that we can also incorporate the information? Any fitness or food tracking apps? With this integration, we can get a better idea of how exercise is affecting your blood sugars and if your carb and insulin ratios are adjusted for the foods you eat and when you eat them.

Now we’re going to check your A1c right here in the office with a simple finger poke. We know how annoying it can be for you to have to go to a separate lab early in the morning before work and before your appointment to get your blood drawn to check your A1c. And then have the lab forget to send it to your doctor so it isn’t there when you arrive for your appointment. We wouldn’t want that to happen to you.

You’ll be in exam room 2. It looks like the doctor is ready for you now.

Doctor: Hi Reva. I wanted to let you know that all your prescriptions are up to date. We were contacted by your pharmacy that your insulin prescription needed a refill. So we took care of that and it should be all set when you’re ready to order more.

So, how do you feel things are going? I have your graphs up on the screen and I can see some places that we can make some small adjustments. But before we go into that, do you have any specific questions or concerns  you’d like to talk about?

Our nutritionist is in the office today if you’d like to meet with her after we finish. Now let’s take a look at your graphs. Your A1c is looking good, good work on improving it since our last visit.

I also wanted to see if you’d be open to talking about or trying different brands of insulin or other medications that have been approved for use with type 1 diabetics to see if we can get your numbers under tighter control. What I would hate to have happen is to not talk about other options that exist, since treatment of type 1 diabetes has progressed over the years. We pride ourselves at this office with keeping up to date with the latest research, technologies, and treatment options. You deserve the best care that we can provide and we will work together to make sure you get it and reach the goals that we’ve worked together to set.

Is there anything else that you’d like to cover that I may have missed today? I want to make sure that you feel like you got the most out of this appointment and feel comfortable with your changes and next steps. Great.

Well, I look forward to seeing you in 3 months. If you have any questions over the next few months, please don’t hesitate to call, email me, or use the patient portal to communicate and I will personally respond within 24 hours. I would hate for you to have to make multiple calls and wait days to get a simple answer from me.

Have a good rest of your day and keep up the good work!

And scene.

Diabetes Blog Week Day 3- Language

Diabetes Blog Week

Today’s topic:  Many advocate for the importance of using non-stigmatizing, inclusive and non-judgmental language when speaking about or to people with diabetes. For some, they don’t care, others care passionately. Where do you stand when it comes to “person with diabetes” versus “diabetic”, or “checking” blood sugar versus “testing”, or any of the tons of other examples?

 

“You’re not diabetic. You have diabetes.” This is what my mom used to say to me back when I was first diagnosed. I was 12 years old. Honestly at that time, that distinction wasn’t that important to me, or maybe I just didn’t understand the difference. Today, I use the phrases interchangeably, although I get why my mom made the distinction. She didn’t want me to define myself by my diabetes. It was something that I had, not who I was. But while I don’t feel limited by my diabetes, it is a big part of who I am however I say it.

That was the first time I really thought about the nuanced language we use to talk about diabetes. But it wasn’t the last.

It was a few years ago. I was at my endocrinologist’s office for my appointment. My doctor had left the room briefly for something and my chart was open in front of me. I peeked over to see what was on the screen and I saw it: “diabetes mellitus type 1, uncontrolled“.

Uncontrolled?! Who, me?? The person who tries every day to manage my diabetes? The person who is constantly carb counting, correcting highs, and treating lows? The person who is always thinking about diabetes is uncontrolled?! What?!

It was such a slap in the face to see those words on the screen. I was sad and angry and confused. I felt like I had been incorrectly labeled…and judged. I felt like I wanted to write a paragraph explanation next to that word for whoever might read it. Why couldn’t it say something like, “Engaged patient, making progress, but room for improvement”? I know now that what I saw was part of the ICD-9 codes for billing purposes. And yes, at the time my A1c may have been higher that I’d like. But the fact that my struggles and effort of living a normal life with such a challenging chronic disease had been reduced to that single word was demoralizing.

I’ve since checked the codes that my doctor used, and I haven’t seen uncontrolled used again. But I’ve never been so angered and hurt by a word used to describe me and my diabetes. Even though I wasn’t necessarily meant to see what was written and it wasn’t a word that my doctor ever used directly with me, it demonstrated the power a single word can have and how important it is to be cognizant of the language we use when speaking about and describing diabetes. You never quite know the effect it may have.

Can I have a re-do?

I often dread my endocrinologist appointments. But at the same time, I’m thankful for the 4 appointments each year. They’re forced moments of reflection, confrontation, and adjustment. Before each appointment, I consider how things are going. I know if the past 3 months have been good or bad. If it hasn’t been a good 3 months, it’s a time to confront myself and delve into why my numbers have been high or low or just all over the place. Sometimes it’s my own self-management habits that have slipped, other times it’s factors that are out of my control like getting sick. Then based on how things are going, I make adjustments along with my doctor and move forward.

Today was one of those appointments that I just wanted to get over with. The past month and a half has been rough. My numbers have been running high consistently. Between getting a pretty horrible cold that lingered, having to go on steroids for the sickness, stress from a breakup, adjusting to time changes of traveling, and then just a weird couple weeks where it seemed like my insulin wasn’t working as it normally does, I knew my doctor would be looking at some pretty awful numbers at our appointment.

Part of me is disappointed. I don’t like to be this off track. I don’t like knowing that I’m potentially doing lasting damage to my body, that I’m increasing my risk of complications. But I also know that life happens. There’s a lot that I can’t control and those events may unfortunately impact my health by way of my blood sugar. All I can do is my best to try to manage the consequences.

Diabetes is a chronic disease. It means that as of right now, I’m stuck with it for the long haul, it’s not going anywhere. And as much as I get caught up in these mini 3 month sprints between appointments, there’s a bigger picture. Three months is not very long when you look at a lifetime. And shit happens. There will be highs and lows in life just as there are in my blood sugar. I admit, I’ve had other things on my mind lately besides my diabetes and I’m sure that’s played a part. But I can’t control everything that happens, at some some point you have to let go and just do the best you can within your circumstances.

So yea, I’m not thrilled about this appointment and the past few months. But unfortunately there’s no re-do’s or rewinds with a chronic condition. What’s done is done. Now, I’m putting aside my excuses and focusing on moving forward.

 

No excuses

Ugh it’s been too long! I feel terrible for neglecting you for so long! A lot has happened that I want to tell you about, and I will…eventually. But I feel like I need to rewind to the first notable thing that happened since my last post.

About 2 months ago I had an appointment with my endocrinologist. This is not unusual, I have one every 3 months. But I knew this appointment would be different.

When I was younger, I used to say on the day of my endo appointment, “I’m going to the doctor to get yelled at today.” Now my doctor wouldn’t really yell at me, but I knew that I wasn’t doing that well and that they would in a nice and appropriate way, tell me to get my shit together.

I approached this appointment with a similar attitude. I was dreading the appointment. The previous three months were just not great. My numbers were all over the place, but mostly too high. Trust me I had my excuses ready…sicknesses, bent infusion sets, a bout of insomnia. But deep down I knew those really weren’t the reasons for three months of high numbers. It was more like apathy, laziness, and lack of discipline. I knew that really I only had myself to blame.

I got my A1c back. It was high. The highest its been in 3 years. In fact it was the same number that prompted me to start this blog in the first place and make some major changes.

I wasn’t surprised, but I was disheartened and disappointed.

My endo looked at me. “So what happened?”

My excuses were on the tip of my tongue. But I held back. I knew I had to take responsibility for my actions (and lack there of) and for the consequences of them.

“It’s just been a bad three months.”

She nodded. “Do you want to make some adjustments or do you want to try again?”

“I’ll try again.”

It wasn’t a good appointment. But I have to admit, in many ways I feel proud.

I’m proud of myself for not making excuses, I’m proud of myself for taking responsibility for my health. I’m proud of myself for only momentarily becoming discouraged, and instead vowing to “try again” and do better next time. I’m not proud of my A1c, but I know I’ll get back to what I was.

I found a quote online, “Every set back is a set up for a come back.” Well watch out, because I’m making a hell of a come back!

2015 Diabetes Blog Week Day 4- Changes

Diabetes Blog Week

When I think about diabetes and what I’d like to see changed, one word comes to mind. Well maybe 2, a cure would be a nice change. But the word I’d like to focus on is integration.

Integration. I could yell it from the rooftops. Integration would make diabetes so much easier to manage. It would make communication so much more effective. It would make our lives in general a little less burdensome. 


What exactly am I talking about?

I want diabetes devices talking to other diabetes devices. I want my pump, my meter, and my CGM to all communicate constantly. And while I know this is unrealistic, I wish that this communication could happen across companies so that my dexcom CGM could talk to my Medtronic pump or a Bayer meter could talk to an animas pump. I want numbers and data flowing freely from one to the other, whether it’s then used in a calculation, helping to inform a decision, or just being stored for later retrieval.

I want diabetes devices talking to non diabetes devices. I want my CGM numbers and my pump talking with my phone, presenting my data (carbs, boluses, blood sugars) in an easy to read and accessible manner in an app. I want their data showing up on a graph on my computer or tablet. I want other apps that I’m using to integrate in a platform with my diabetes data, whether it’s food tracking that I do or exercise tracking. How great would it be for one app that would have my carb and bolus information from my pump, graphed against my blood sugars that are collecting from my meter and CGM, informed by my Fitbit tracker active minutes and steps, and integrated with the food that I tracked during the day in My Fitness Pal?! Think about how much easier it would be to see a trends and potential causes for highs and lows. Based on the food you ate here, it looks like you gave too much insulin and that’s why you dropped low here.

I want ALL of these devices talking to my doctor. I want to be able to walk into my endocrinologist’s office or even my primary care physician, or eye doctor, or really any doctor’s office and have all of this information available to them. I want the information from all of my devices to be consolidated into a format that is integrated right into my medical record. Then when I go to the endo, they aren’t making suggestions based off of just my CGM, they are looking at the complete picture with little burden to me since all of this uploading, syncing, and integration happens automatically. 


I’m hopeful that these changes are coming soon, that this is the future of diabetes self-care. Integration will be a requirement, not just a nice feature. 


This post is part of the 2015 Diabetes Blog Week. Today’s topic: 
Today let’s talk about changes, in one of two ways.  Either tell us what you’d most like to see change about diabetes, in any way.  This can be management tools, devices, medications, people’s perceptions, your own feelings – anything at all that you feel could use changing.  OR reflect back on some changes you or your loved one has seen or been through since being diagnosed with diabetes.  Were they expected or did they surprise you? You can read more posts on this topic here

The Patient Experience

I work for a global healthcare leader. A couple weeks ago we had our company conference. While listening to the various speakers within the different business segments of the company, one theme became very prevalent. Leaders in pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and consumer healthcare, all kept emphasizing the same topic: the patient experience. Speeches were littered with phrases like, “patient-centered”, the “patient journey”, “putting the patient first”. As a public health professional and as a chronic disease patient myself, I was happy to see the clear focus shifting towards the patient.

But then I stopped to think about what this really means. As a type 1 diabetes patient, what does patient-centered care really look like?

To start, I can tell you what it does not look like. A few days ago, I received this letter from my health insurance company. At the top of the letter it read, “Talk to your doctor about this important issue. It may improve your health.” Intrigued, I kept reading. The letter explained that they had basically reviewed my health records and wanted to bring a potential health problem to my attention so that I may speak to my doctor about it. The health topic was on the back of the letter. Since my various doctors have already tested and reviewed my blood work, I was curious what health issue they may have missed. I turned over the letter.

The first line on the back said, “Our data shows that you may have diabetes.” The paragraph went on to explain the importance of checking for protein in the urine as a sign of kidney damage if you have diabetes. It’s not the letter itself that annoys me. I actually think it’s great that the health insurance company is sending reminders or health information to patients to bring up with their doctor. It’s the fact that the first line says, that I may have diabetes. Guess what? I do. And I have for the past 14 years. Honestly I find this letter off-putting and probably has the opposite effect than intended. I expect that my health insurance would know that I have diabetes, they see the diagnosis codes for all my doctor’s appointments, they aren’t making a leap to say that I have it. Telling me that I may have diabetes basically says that you don’t know me at all. It’s the opposite of patient-centered. It’s communicating that I’m just another medical record that a computer scanned and looked for key words or results to send a form letter.

If they had just changed the top line, I would have reacted completely different to the letter. They should have instead said, “Reva, since you have type 1 diabetes, here is some information that you may want to bring up with your doctor at your next visit.” This would have instilled confidence that my health insurance company actually knows my health condition, it would have felt more personal, and I would have reacted overall more positively to the actual information rather than getting caught up in the first line.

My “patient experience” doesn’t just happen in my endocrinologist’s office 4 times a year, it’s tied up in everything that is communicated to me and that I do day-to-day. It’s in letters like this one. It’s in all the moments between doctor’s appointments. It’s in the way that the doctor speaks to me and even in their particular word choices when talking about my diabetes. It’s in the waiting room or exam room when I’m waiting 30 minutes to talk to the doctor for less than 15. It’s in my conversations with customer service about my pump or CGM. It’s in my multiple phone calls with my mail order pharmacy when they screw up my insulin prescription or the countless inconveniences of getting my a1c test done. My patient experience involves the lack of integration and communication between doctors and health care systems and even medical devices.

I applaud the shift and emphasis on the patient experience. It’s about time. When a patient truly feels at the center of their care, that their time and efforts are acknowledged and respected, when their obstacles are recognized and addressed, I think there is huge potential for helping patients live longer and healthier lives. I’m glad to see that we’ve taken the first steps of a long, but necessary journey.

Missing puzzle pieces

I’ve felt like Goldilocks lately. Although maybe a Goldilocks with brown curly hair and way less luck.

I’m starting to have issues with my new endo. Again, the issues that I am having are less about the specific doctors and more about my frustrations with doctor’s and the office not utilizing the technologies that are available to them to their full potential. And misusing the ones that are.

Like most T1Ds, I have a lot of devices that carry a lot of data. And those devices are able to download their information when connected to a computer. But you get slightly different information from my pump (finger prick glucose numbers and insulin delivery amounts) than from my CGM (glucose numbers from the sensor) and I don’t always think that the CGM is the most accurate, especially at the beginning or end of the cycle I wear it.

At my new endo office, my doctor downloads my CGM and pulls up a graph of the last week. She doesn’t take my pump or meter, in fact, I once asked why not and she wasn’t even sure she had the right equipment to download from the pump. I completely trust that my doctor knows what she is doing and her recommendations do make sense. But I’m often left wondering if the recommendations would be the same if we were looking at 2 or 3 weeks worth of data or even looking at glucose numbers from my meter (which are on my pump) in addition to my CGM.

On one hand, I’m grateful. I remember when I was first diagnosed being handed a little log book that I would have to manually write in my glucose numbers. But on the other hand, I’m frustrated with the way things are. I want integration. Maybe it’s time that I align my pump and CGM to compatible companies. Then at least all 3 of my devices would be talking to each other for a more complete picture. But I’m lazy and don’t want to learn a whole new pump or CGM system when I’m generally satisfied with both separately.

And while part of the responsibility is fully on me as the patient, another part is on the doctor and the offices to keep up with changing technologies so that they are effectively and accurately using the data that is available to them.

I feel like my diabetes is a puzzle and my doctor is only looking at a handful of pieces when telling me what to change. You’re looking at the trends in my blood sugars, but you’re not looking at my boluses throughout the day. You’re not looking at the foods I’m eating (which I have been tracking in a separate app for the past 6 weeks) or exactly when I eat them (besides asking me generally when I eat). You’re not looking at when I’m exercising and what kind of exercise I’m doing, when my cycle is, when I got sick, and even when I was feeling extra stressed. My numbers are all important, but alone, they lose some of their meaning. You’re looking at my blood sugars essentially in isolation because:

A) that’s the data that’s available to you
B) we only have a finite time together so you aren’t able to ask me about all these other factors
C) there is no universally used platform that can integrate this information easily for you

I’m frustrated. But I’m also hopeful. I know that today, my data is more available, accessible, and interpretable than it was 10 years ago. But I know we have a ways to go before every office has the equipment, the skill and the motivation to look at the whole puzzle for every one of their patients, and not just a few pieces.

The Epic Letter of Complaint

I’m not one to typically complain. I rarely send back meals or make a scene about the poor service I receive. I don’t leave complaint cards or online reviews, even when sometimes I should. I don’t like confrontation and I lack assertiveness. These are things I know about myself and am working on changing. And when I do decide to stand up for myself and make a phone call about poor service, I often get so distraught that the tears start flowing, completely undermining my efforts.

This year has been a true test of my patience and my tolerance for poor treatment. Between my endocrinology office and online mail pharmacy, I have spent countless hours on the phone or waiting to get the care and medicines that I need.

When the first incident happened, I was upset, but I let it go. It was the first time something had happened in the past 8 years so I didn’t make a big deal. When the second incident happened, I was perturbed and frustrated. I knew what was happening and the way that I was being treated was wrong. I made a complaint, but I still didn’t feel that my situation was being properly recognized and dealt with. I started thinking about switching doctors, but I still stayed. When the third incident happened, enough was enough. I was mad. Something had to be done.

I wrote this letter (email) back in June. I sent it yesterday. Why did I wait so long? Partially because I didn’t want to burn any bridges until I was sure that I wouldn’t be coming back, until I had secured a new doctor that I liked. Since this has now been accomplished, I was ready.

Why a letter? As I mentioned early, it’s often hard for me to get everything I need to say out before the tears take over. I wanted to be taken seriously, I wanted to be sure that I said everything I wanted to say. And while emotion isn’t bad, I didn’t want it to get in the way so I articulated my experiences in writing.

What was I hoping to accomplish by sending the letter? Honestly, I just wanted the office to know what kind of errors were being made and the kind of treatment the office was providing so hopefully no one else would have to go through what I went through. Yes I wanted an apology and my feelings to be validated, but more importantly, I want to be sure that other patients are well cared for and don’t slip through the cracks the way I did.

So I sent this letter. I know it’s long, but hey, a lot of shit happened that I wanted to tell them about.

Dear Mr. X*,
I have been a type 1 diabetes patient in your office for the past 8 years.
I have been on an insulin pump this entire time.
Several recent medical error events in your office have made me frustrated and worried about the care that I have been receiving.
Recently, while attempting to refill my Humalog prescription I was asked by my mail order pharmacy to call them and verify the prescription that they had received from Dr. Y. This prescription was for 27 vials of insulin, and the instructions were for me to inject 100u three times a day. I usually only require 9 vials for the 3 months.
1.       As I stated earlier, I have been on an insulin pump for the past 12 years, nowhere in my record should it be recorded that I inject insulin
2.       This amount of insulin would probably kill me
3.       I once again needed to call your office and have this corrected with my mail pharmacy so that my necessary prescription could be filled before I ran out of insulin.
When I called the endocrinology office to get the prescription corrected, I talked to a nurse who figured out where the mistake was. I told her that I needed the correct amount sent to the mail pharmacy and she assured me that she was doing this electronically as we spoke on the phone. The next day I still had not received any notification from the mail pharmacy saying that it was received, so once again I called back the office to inquire as to what happened. After checking, it was determined that the prescription was supposedly sent to a different pharmacy and not the mail pharmacy,  although I had asked multiple times over multiple communications for this insurance company mandated change.
Frustrated that this was again not what I had requested, I made sure the nurse sent it to the correct pharmacy. I then called the other pharmacy to let them know that the prescription was incorrectly called in, that I would not be picking it up, and they informed me that they never received a prescription for insulin!
This makes me question both the medical record software and whether your office ever called it in to begin with.
I was forced to once again call the endocrinology office to verify that everything was correct since I was starting to run out of insulin, and was able to get this confirmation.
It is unacceptable that this process took four phone calls to get the correct prescription to the correct pharmacy over multiple days.  As you know, insulin is essential to my health, with fatal consequences if I run out.
And this is not the first time that the lack of care from this office has occurred. Earlier this year, I drove over 40 miles taking off work, waited 90 minutes for an appointment only then to be told by another doctor at the practice (Dr. Y was not seeing patients during this time) that she had clinicals now and could not see me that day and that I would have to come back the next day. Although being compensated for the gas from your office was a confirmation of a problem, this did not instill in me any feeling that I was “appreciated” as a patient, rather that I was considered just another body to move around to the convenience of the doctor.
Additionally, during this past winter, it took 3 weeks and multiple phone calls to get a prescription refilled for my Dexcom sensors due to a misunderstanding in your office that I wanted a refill and not a prescription for a whole new system. During those 3 weeks, I was out of sensors, thus not able to use my Dexcom unit.
This event itself was totally unacceptable.  But coupled with the recent insulin debacle, it makes me question the safeguards (if any) present in your office.
As a patient, and healthcare consumer, this utter lack of respect  of my time, poor record keeping by your office,  and obvious lack of concern for my welling being shown by your staff is not only medically concerning but totally unacceptable.
I have a Master’s Degree in Public Health, and work in the Healthcare arena. I have a high level of health literacy, and unlike many, I am able to generally navigate the complicated and complex health care system. Many if not most of your patients do not have this ability. I hope that you institute changes to the offices policies and practices, so that no one else will have to go through the ludicrous process that I had to endure to get my life sustaining medication and diabetes sensors. This multiple event experience has been completely unacceptable.
If you would like to discuss this further, I can be reached at XXX-XXX-XXXX
Thank you,
Reva
*All identifying information has been removed from this letter

Five hours after the email was sent, I received a phone call from the administrative director who I sent this letter to. He apologized for my experiences and told me that he had shared my letter with their chief of clinical services who would be looking into it more and following up. He thanked me for detailing my complaint and asked me if there was anything that I wanted to add. He recognized that I had chosen to leave the practice, but hoped that I would consider them again in the future.

I don’t know what will come of my letter and if any changes will actually be made, but I’m proud of myself for sending it. The office needs to know what happened so it can protect its patients. I may not be the most assertive person, but I’m glad that this time I wasn’t silent. I’m glad that I spoke up for myself and made my complaints known. Hopefully my complaint can help bring positive changes to the practice and improve everyone’s experiences, even if it’s too late for me.